Echo Dell

I am so Happy that Indian Echo Caverns is making the transition away from the stereotypical branding it had for decades, and the new name is Echo Dell. The Susquehannocks were the first recorded Native American tribe in the area, with numerous other tribes and foreigners utilizing the cave through the centuries thereafter. The caverns opened commercially on May 6, 1929, with the added attraction of being able to keep a refreshing 52 degrees year round. The ticket prices are steep compared to when I was a kid…$18.50 for adults, and $12 for the kiddos, but with that you get a 45 min. tour of the caverns, access to the petting zoo, and use of their picnic areas. It’s a good call for a summer activity, and can be fun exploring an environment not available to most people’s lives.

There is a timed entrance rotation and it is important to note it is not wheelchair accessible. There are extensive steps to descend to the entrance of the cave, and once inside the guide begins a story about the history of the limestone cave, while also pointing out some things to keep watch for. Farther in you are surrounded by high ceilings and usually given some sort of geology lesson on how it was shaped over million’s of years. Being led through the path to the right the guide weaves a fantasy story of the formations found in the rock, as well as a moment of complete darkness when they turn off the lights…I think all of the cave’s do this, and it never gets old.

When being led down the path to the left, you pass by a mineral pool that is truly something out of a sci-fi scene…so alien and beautiful, it’s no wonder people choose to be married in the caverns. But beware, there are the occasional bats, water dripping on your head, and really only one spot that is able to handle a crowd. You are then led over an elevated bridge to exit where you came in at. It’s a different experience, and makes you want to bring your kids on a hot summer day, plus you never know when you will spark a lifelong interest, or future geologist.

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